How to use "neither/nor"

My clients frequently ask me whether they're using "nor" correctly. The most common answer is that one should use neither with nor and either with or
  Neither the Company nor any of its Subsidiaries has received notice of any pending investigation.
  Either the Buyer or the Company may terminate this agreement at any time. 

However, there is a bit more you need to watch out for with neither/nor

Nor can be used without neither when combining two negative ideas in a sentence, provided both are verb phrases: He did not stop at the stop sign, nor did he use his turn signal. When the negatives are nouns or adjectives, stick with or: Do not execute section A or section B until the closing date.

When using neither/nor, make sure both clauses are parallel. Consider the following sentence: The Seller will be responsible neither for attorneys' fees incurred by the Company, nor reimburse the Company for any costs related to the Sale. The problems in this sentence arise from the fact that neither comes after the verb phrase will be responsible. It can be fixed several ways, for example:
The Seller will neither be responsible for attorneys' fees incurred by the Company, nor reimburse the Company for any costs related to the Sale. 
The Seller will not be responsible for attorneys' fees incurred by the Company, nor reimburse the Company for any costs related to the Sale.

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